Wednesday, September 10, 2014

5 Steps to Marketing Success - TSBDC Seminar on September 18

Steps to Marketing Success

Thursday, September 18, 2014 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Fee: $ 25.00
Payment will be made at the workshop. Check or cash preferred.
This workshop is designed to give you a real world approach for marketing your business!
1. Fine tune your focus
2. Who are your customers
3. Competitive advantage
4. Marketing message and promotion - (with over 30 different methods)
5. Schedule your activities and track your progress

You will leave this workshop with a tangible plan to reach your customers on a consistent basis.
To get here, take the GAP Blvd entrance to Volunteer State Community College. Then take your first entrance on the right into the parking lot. The 300 Building will located in the round-a-bout and it has a striped awning and the number 300 on the front.

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

4 MARKETING LESSONS FROM THE ALS ICE BUCKET CHALLENGE



           So, I get a text from my old college roommate, Matt Wilson.  It is simply a link to Facebook.  Keep in mind, I am one of seven people on planet earth not to have a Facebook page.  But I don’t need Facebook.  I know what it is.  The dreaded ALS Ice Bucket Challenge!  And, despite the backlash it’s received for slacktivism, vanity, and wasting water, it has raised an amazing amount of money and awareness for ALS research. 

Anyway, one cold bucket of ice water and a donation later, I see a few things as it relates to marketing small businesses. 

*Disclaimer - And yeah, I know this phenomenon is all but over and everyone has moved on to the next shiny object, however, it takes me this long to digest information and make something useful of it.

1.       MAKE IT ALL ABOUT THE PERSON MAKING THE PURCHASE (OR IN THIS CASE, A DONATION) – Yes, the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge is supposed to be about raising awareness and money, but in reality, it became as much about the person donating, as it did anything.  This is how you should make your customers feel.  It is not about the features, advantages, and benefits of your product.  It is about the person or business buying from you.  Shower them with public praise, send them a thank you card, and find a way to support them.

2.       IT USED VIDEO - The Ice Bucket Challenge wouldn't have even happened if it used an elevator pitch, memo, or even a fancy photo.  Video has become much easier to create, is more engaging, and video has a much higher engagement rate than anything else.

3.       IT'S FUN AND EASY TO DO - Admit it.  One minute you are watching the Kardashians dump ice water on their heads and then the next minute your preacher is doing the same thing.  A simple and funny activity can get your customer’s attention. And if you can make it easy for them to sign up for your loyalty program or redeem a coupon (no awkward procedures or lengthy forms to fill out), they will follow you even more.

4.       THERE IS SPECIFIC CALL TO ACTION – When Peter Frates got the ball rolling with the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, he didn’t say, “so if you ever need to give a donation, make sure you consider ALS.”  He challenged someone specifically.  If you want customers to buy, tell them what specifically you are offering and give specific steps to make a purchase. 

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

QuickBooks Intro for Small Businesses



This QuickBooks workshop is designed for basic users and small business owners that operate a for-profit business.  

Friday, August 29, 2014 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Volunteer State Community College, Building 300, Room 104
$45, payable at the workshop (cash or check preferred)
 
SPACE IS LIMITED, SO REGISTER SOON
Course Introduction:
This course is an introduction to QuickBooks. Its main objective is to introduce you to the basic features in QuickBooks and give you an opportunity for hands-on practice. You’ll learn about the types of information you need to track in your business, and you’ll see how to enter that information and track it in QuickBooks. By the time you complete the course, you’ll have a good idea of all that QuickBooks offers, you’ll be familiar with the most common tasks, and you’ll know where to find information about more advanced features.

Course Outline:
• Introducing QuickBooks
• All the accounting you need to know
• Working with lists
• Working with bank accounts
• Tracking credit card transactions
• Using sales forms in QuickBooks
• Receiving payments and making deposits
• Entering and paying bills
• Creating and customizing QuickBooks reports

Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Think Inside-the-Box

So, now that Lane is 1.5 years old (you quit doing months when you have three kids) he is big enough to play with his older sisters.  And by playing, I mean they rip his shirt off and stuff him in the toy box.  However, the last time they did this, he seemed to be fine in there.  He wasn’t interested in all of the toys outside of the box.  He had a woobm-woobm (that’s car in Lane speak) and he was quite content.

Sometimes entrepreneurs should consider this type of in-the-box mentality.  Why would anyone ever do that? Everyone else has jumped out-of-the-box.  CEO’s demand out-of-the-box thinking and even non-profits, churches, and schools think out-of-the-box

What usually works well is utilizing a different type of strategy than everyone else. That’s why everyone got out-of-the-box in the first place.  So, it may be the time to jump back in-the-box.

Also, the box has gotten huge!  There are all kinds of cool new toys in here.  So before you employ the next hip tool or technique, consider some of the following in-the-box thinking for your business.
  • Before you go app or open source software crazy, look at Office 365 for $5/month.  It’s the same Microsoft Office you have always used and now it’s all online.  You could also use Google Apps for $5/month.  Now that they have gotten into world domination, they are not as hip as they used to be, so in-the-box they go!
  • Before you implement a high end pay-per-click/super referral network/SEO wizard strategy to increase your sales, schedule at least 2 people each week to meet for coffee or lunch.  Do not go under the guise that you will faux listen to them for 10 minutes and then you get to make a sales pitch.  Simply have a genuine chat and find a way to help that person.  And do it, because you will enjoy doing it and because it matters.  The side effect will usually be more business in your direction.
  • Before you look for crowdfunding, i.e. Indegogo, The Lending Club, or Kickstarter, to fund your next venture, consider visiting your local banker.  Lending has picked up, equity in homes is on the rise, and you won’t have to deal with investors. 



Monday, July 14, 2014

Friday, June 27, 2014

What is the Biggest Bang for Your Buck?

   Being frugal (that’s French for cheapskate), I am always looking to squeeze the most out of every penny.

   For example, I have discovered the following: 

· Netflix – For $8 each month, we have been able to disconnect cable, choose which shows our kids watch (lots of PBS), and skip commercials.

· Aldi produce – Speaking of the kiddos, they have begun eating fruits and veggies. Lots of them. And you know what’s expensive? Fruits and veggies. Aldi has them for much less than most grocery stores and they have the stuff we eat.

· TVA energy audit – After living in our new house for a few months we noticed the energy bill was a little higher than expected. We decided to use the In-Home Energy Evaluation Program from TVA. They gave us a cash rebate for installing home energy improvements. In our case that was sealing a leaky duct system and we saw our electricity bill drop significantly.

   You know who else likes being frugal? Business owners! Let’s hear what two very successful and local business owners had to say about what their “biggest bang for their buck” has been.

   Quick tip; they’re both people related. 

 Pest Inc Julie Yant, owner of P.E.S.T. Inc. - My advice as to the best bang for your buck is to do as many processes "in house" for as long as you can. For example, we knew enough about most business processes that we did all accounting, software, HR, web, and even quarterly taxes & payroll in house, before we outsourced. Now, if you're not competent in something, then don't screw something up by trying this, but my advice is to take as many hands on small business classes and workshops that you can to save overhead costs. Don't get a nice, fancy office - use that spare bedroom if you can until you can afford to hang out your own shingle - again, if that suits your business. Grow, slow and controlled. Rapid growth often leads to too many problems to overcome and the demise of many small businesses. 


   Jason Duncan, owner of Future Vision Energy - Our best bang for the buck has been hiring good employees. Last year was a pivotal year for us. We were growing and I was getting overwhelmed with tasks that another person could easily handle without much training. Hiring a good assistant--even though we didn't know for sure if we could afford it--was worth every penny. As it turned out we couldn't afford NOT to. She was our first hire and we quickly moved her to full time status with a nice raise. 

   As she freed me up to do more tasks that directly created revenue, I turned my focus to hiring more people. We've since hired two full-time sales consultants, an operations manager, a technology director, and a full-time project manager. With each hire, our overall revenue increases because it frees us up to focus on sales and marketing-related activities. Hiring the right people at the right time has been our biggest "bang for the buck".


Monday, June 23, 2014

July Seminars


Starting a Small Business workshop of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee Small Business Development Center, 4-6 p.m. Tuesday, July 8, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN in Building 300. Registration is required. Reserve online. www.tsbdc.org. Free.

5 Steps to Marketing Success workshop of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee Small Business Development Center, 9-12 p.m. Thursday, July 10, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN in Building 300. Registration is required. Reserve online. www.tsbdc.org. $25, payable at the workshop.


Best Mobile Apps for Your Business workshop of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee Small Business Development Center, 3-4 p.m. Thursday, July 24, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN in Building 300. Registration is required. Reserve online. www.tsbdc.org. Free

Friday, May 23, 2014

7 Phrases Entrepreneurs (Or Really Anyone) Should Stop Using

I’m avoiding a storied intro to prevent myself from accidentally using one of the phrases below.  Just
Tom Hanks agrees.  And everybody likes Tom Hanks.
sayin’.  Dang it!
  1. I’m just not a computer person – This is not 1995 and we are not listening to dial up noises, trying to cancel AOL, or fighting the blue screen of death.  Technology has come a long way, so most businesses should have a decent looking website, accounting software and have most transactions automated.
  2. People just don’t want to work anymore – Ughhh…..you are right that some folks are looking for a free ride, but most people are willing to earn a living.  We have turnover, when we hire someone at the last minute, don’t train them, or spend time praising them for the things they are doing correctly.
  3. I don’t know about this next generation – Every previous generation sounds like Grumpy Old Man from Saturday Night Live.  For example, Gorat from the Stone Age says, “Plato, think he smart, with his wheel and philosophy.  In my day, we just had square and cave drawing.  And we like it.  No, we loved it!”  Millennials may be a little self-absorbed, however, they are more socially aware than previous generations, tech savvy, and they are not going away. 
  4. It is, what it isTranslation, “I’m too lazy to find a solution.”  Or, even explain the situation, which lacks a solution.
  5. Just sayin’ – A big one here in the South.  And 1st cousin to “It is, what it is.”
  6. Please advise – This is just a passive aggressive way to make someone else explain every, single step for you.  “Dear CPA, I just received my tax returns and it says I owe $3,000.  Please advise.”  
  7. I must be doing something right, because I’m still here - Well, that may be true in part, however, just being here doesn’t equate to success.  Otherwise the post office and your appendix would be considered a roaring success.

Monday, May 19, 2014

June Seminars

Export Boot Camp for Small Businesses workshop of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee www.tsbdc.org. Free.
Small Business Development Center, 9-11 a.m. Thursday, May 29, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN in the Betty Gibson Hall, Room 107C. Registration is required. Reserve online.


Health Care Reform, Preparing Your Business for the 2015 Mandates workshop of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee Small Business Development Center, 3-4 p.m. Tuesday, June 3, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN in the Betty Gibson Hall, Conference Room 104. Registration is required. Reserve online. www.tsbdc.org. Free.

Estate Planning for Small Business Owners workshop of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee Small Business Development Center, 3-4 p.m. Thursday, June 5, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN in the Betty Gibson Hall, Conference Room 104. Registration is required. Reserve online. www.tsbdc.org. Free.

Social Media Digital Marketing Course of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee Small Business Development Center, 9-4 p.m. Friday, June 6, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN in Building 300, Room 104. Registration is required. Reserve online. www.tsbdc.org. Attendees are encouraged to bring their laptop or tablet.  $99 (payable at the workshop.)

Starting a Small Business workshop of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee Small Business Development Center, 4-6 p.m. Tuesday, June 17, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN in the Betty Gibson Hall, Gibson Conf Room 104. Registration is required. Reserve online. www.tsbdc.org. Free.

Monday, May 5, 2014

Shark Tank winner starts with the SBDC




I totally missed this a while back.  I watch this show religiously and remember this guy well.  Mr. Tod, a client at the Small Business Development Center at Raritan Valley Community College is doing quite well too.

http://www.sbdcrvcc.com/2010/mr-todd-wins-2009-success-award/


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Mr. Tod's testimonial about the SBDC: “The SBDC at RVCC has been a blessing to my business. My recent SBA loan approval was a direct result of my involvement with the SBDC. I can’t say enough about the assistance I received. I would urge any entrepreneur who is serious about taking their business to the next level to explore the mentorship and counseling opportunities available at the SBDC.” Tod Wilson, Mr. Tod’s Pie Factory 2009 ABC Shark Tank Winner 

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

No Soup for You!


   One of my favorite TV shows of all time is Seinfeld.  One of my favorite episodes is The Soup NaziRemember him?  The Soup Nazi had a tiny take out spot that only had three or four soups to choose from. He was best known for his strict regimen that he constantly demanded of his patrons.  Have exact change, move through line swiftly, and NO questions.



COME BACK ONE YEAR! NEX

  The Soup Nazi….
  • Had a niche
  • Knew what made him different
  • Had an outstanding product
  • Didn’t get caught up in all of the other things he could do: Sandwich Nazi, Coffee Nazi, Bread Pudding Nazi


   Conversely, I am often inundated by all types of consultants, i.e. business coaches, accountants, insurance agents, bankers, candlestick makers, attorneys, payroll companies, benefits specialists, financial advisors, etc., that "Would like to meet with me to see if we have the opportunity to partner together and leverage our resources." 
  • When I ask them who their target is, it is anyone who owns a business. 
  • When I ask them what makes them different it is their price, quality, experience, and blah, blah, blah. 
  • When I ask them about their core product or service, they are so excited to let me know they have 28 specialty products and services.
  • When I ask them who wouldn’t be a good customer they say, “uh, well, hmm, mumble, mumble, good fit, mumble, mumble.”



  They look, walk, talk, sound, and even dress like everyone else in their profession.  And that means there is no particular reason for me to work with them or direct any of my clients their way.

  So who do you want to be? 
A general handyman or a Restaurant Maintenance Guy
A regular clothing store or a Men’s Consignment store
A run-of-the-mill insurance agent or a Construction Policy Guru

  I know which one the Soup Nazi would be.

Monday, April 28, 2014

May Seminars

How to Write a Business Plan workshop of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee Small Business Development Center, 9-12 p.m. Tuesday, May 8, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN the Betty Gibson Hall, Gibson Conf Room 104. Registration is required. Reserve online. www.tsbdc.org. $30 (payable at the workshop.)


Starting a Small Business workshop of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee Small Business Development Center, 4-6 p.m. Tuesday, May 13, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN in the Betty Gibson Hall, Gibson Conf Room 104. Registration is required. Reserve online. www.tsbdc.org. Free.

QuickBooks Introduction for Small Businesses workshop of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee Small Business Development Center, 9-12 p.m. Friday, May 16, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN in room 175 in the Ramer Administrative Building. Registration is required. Reserve online. www.tsbdc.org. $25 (payable at the workshop.)


Export Boot Camp for Small Businesses workshop of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee Small Business Development Center, 9-11 a.m. Thursday, May 29, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN in the Betty Gibson Hall, Room 107C. Registration is required. Reserve online. www.tsbdc.org. Free

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Did You Hear What She Said?!

 So as I have mentioned before, we have three little ones at home.  Ava is 5, Lilly is 2, and Lane is 1.  The two girls are very close, play well together, but have two totally different personalities.  Ava is our drama queen and Lilly is the comedian. 
   Just the other day, I asked Ava to stay in her seat while we ate dinner.  “Uhhhh, I ammm!” says Ava, while she is standing next to the chair.  She then rolls her eyes (yes, already) and mumbles something about being bossy and then takes her seat.  Lilly then proceeds to hop up and trot over to her little brother’s high chair for some entertainment.  I ask Lilly to sit in her seat.  “I am daddy.” says Lilly, grinning from ear-to-ear.  She then immediately heads back to her chair, plops down, and says, “see daddy, I in my chair.”  We were unhappy with Ava.  We had to hide our laughter with Lilly.  And I’m sure they will both be scarred.

  They did the same exact thing, however, they communicated it differently.  

 Communication breaks down like this:



55% is body language.
38% is tone of voice.
7% is spoken word.  Only 7% is the actual words.

  Here are three simple tips for you regarding communication in your small business: 
1.  When networking, make eye contact and do not look around the room when the other person is speaking.  And put your phone down, when you are having a conversation with someone.  Even though you may be listening, you seem disinterested. 
2.  Smile when you interact with a customer.  Okay, not every single second.  You don’t come off like Buddy the Elf.  But you get the point.  You can also do this, while you are on the phone.  It works.
3.  Be nice.  Sincerely nice, not weirdo, fake nice.  You can tell an employee “Please follow up with the customer after you repair their roof.  Thank you very much.” and still sound like a jerk.  Just because you covered your bases with “please” and “thank you” doesn’t make you a good communicator.  It’s all about how you say it.

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

April Seminars

Starting a Small Business workshop of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee Small Business Development Center, 4-6 p.m. Tuesday, April 15, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN in the Betty Gibson Hall, Gibson Conf Room 104. Registration is required. Reserve online. www.tsbdc.org. Free.

Best Hiring and Managing Practices for Small Businesses workshop of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee Small Business Development Center, 2-4 p.m. Thursday, April  16, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN in the Betty Gibson Hall, Gibson Conf Room 104. Registration is required. Reserve online. www.tsbdc.org. Free.

5 Steps to Marketing Success workshop of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee Small Business Development Center, 9-12 p.m. Wednesday, April 17, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN in the Betty Gibson Hall, Gibson Conf Room 104. Registration is required. Reserve online. www.tsbdc.org. $25 (payable at the workshop.)


Time Management and Goal Setting for your Small Business workshop of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee Small Business Development Center, 9-11:30 a.m. Tuesday, April 29, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN in the Betty Gibson Hall, Gibson Conf Room 104. Registration is required. Reserve online. www.tsbdc.org. $20 (payable at the workshop.) 

Thursday, March 13, 2014

It's Cinderella Time Baby!












  •  One of my favorite times of year in the sports world is the NCAA tournament.  68 teams take to the court to determine the national champion.  There are no convoluted polls to determine the winner.  It is all settled on the court.  And, it is the only time of year, I can stand to listen to Dick Vitale.
        The best part of the tournament is watching the underdogs (Cinderella) teams upset the bigger schools.  Over the last few years, we have seen some Cinderellas find a permanent place at the big boy table.  This used to be the exception to the rule, however, there are more Cinderellas than ever.  Teams such as Gonzaga, Butler, Virginia Commonwealth (VCU), and even Belmont are upsetting higher seeded teams on a regular basis and are now finding themselves to be favored teams themselves.
        What do these teams have in common that allow them to compete?  Fundamentals!  They play smart basketball, screen well, rebound, and even hit their free throws.  This in a league that is becoming more like an And1 Mixtape.
        Sure, there will be the occasional Florida Gulf Coast with their Dunk City approach, however, those will be the exception to the rule.
        Fundamentals - forming or relating to the most important part of something - as Merriam defines it, is what can keep a small business on track.  All too often, we get caught up in what’s new, what the 24 hour news cycle is telling us, or just get bogged down in putting out fires.
       Specifically, financial fundamentals can help guide a small business.  Yes, I am sneaking a financially sound article past you, but rest assured, it will be over soon. 
    Below are three fundamental habits you should maintain in your business.
    1. Accounts Receivable – The last person to get paid is always the small business owner.  Ask my garbage guy.  Sorry, Gordy!
      Make it easy for your clients to make payment, bill immediately, and don’t be afraid to pick up the telephone to ask for your money!
    2. Annual price increases – I couldn’t begin to tell you the number of my clients who have not had a price increase since they have opened.  Your expenses have gone up and, in most cases, so should your prices.
      Consider having an annual price increase, add additional services as needed, and even write a letter to your customers explaining why you are doing this (you will find they are much more understanding than you may believe.)
    3. Keep an eye on expenses – We get so caught up in our day-to-day operations, we forget to keep an eye on the bottom line.Make it a monthly habit to review your cost of goods sold (COGS) and fixed expenses to see if anything is out of line.  You can compare them to your financial statements from last year and even compare them to other businesses in your industry by using a free site like www.bizstats.com.  

    Wednesday, March 5, 2014

    Wednesday, February 19, 2014

    March Seminars

    Social Media Made Easy workshop of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee Small Business Development Center, 9-11 a.m. Thursday, March 6, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN in the Betty Gibson Hall, Gibson Conf Room 104. Registration is required. Reserve online. www.tsbdc.org. Free.



    Starting a Small Business workshop of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee Small Business Development Center, 4-6 p.m. Tuesday, March 18, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN in the Betty Gibson Hall, Gibson Conf Room 104. Registration is required. Reserve online. www.tsbdc.org. Free.



    How to Write a Business Plan workshop of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee Small Business Development Center, 9-12 p.m. Wednesday, March 26, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN in the Betty Gibson Hall, Gibson Conf Room 104. Registration is required. Reserve online. www.tsbdc.org. $30 (payable at the workshop.) 

    Thursday, February 6, 2014

    Let Me Contradict Myself

       We live in a very contradictory time.  Everything is extreme to one side or the other. 

       For example, we have become politically correct to a fault.  The mere mention of your opinion on ANYTHING, can get you banned, fired, or ostracized (my dictionary word of the day) from your social media platform of
    choice.

       Yet, I can’t turn my TV on any regular network show in front of the kids.  Why?  Because they are filled with Viagra commercials, swearing, and gore.  And that’s in the morning.  Thanks Kathie Lee and Hoda.
    Also, everybody wants to be unique
       
       To become unique, everybody looks to see what other people are doing to be different, and then they copy that different person.  That’s why you have so many hip tweeters out there that call themselves “Social Media Maven, hiker/swimmer/runner and lover of insert-bad-for-you-food-here.”
     
       So in the spirit of being contradictory, I would like to offer my two-cents worth when it comes to businesses:
    • It is vital that small business owners to give great customer service.
    • It is vital that small businesses to fire customers. Bad ones.  These are the customers that are simply the “squeaky wheel”, that get greased, only to shut it up.  These customers define the 80/20 rule.  That is they bring you 80% of the headaches and only 20% of the revenue.  If you are afraid to fire them, simply raise the price of your services for them and most will leave.  The one’s that stay…….well at least you will be paid for the extra babysitting.
     
    • Be passionate about what you do.  Eat it, sleep it, and breathe it.
    • You don’t have to follow your passion.  That is, if you are passionate about children, you may not necessarily be cut out to own a daycare.  I am passionate about football, but would probably make a terrible GM (I was a Vince Young supporter, back in the day.)  You just need to be passionate about the business you have and passionate about doing the right things, in the right way.  If you do that, the money will follow.
     
    • Treat employees the way you treat your customers (assuming you treat your customers well.)  The number one reason good employees leave their job, is their relationship with their boss.  Allow them to provide input, give them regular feedback, and a little professional development.
    • Dismiss C level employees.  C level employees are the employees that are there merely for a paycheck.   They are the “that’s not in my job description” employees.  They are the negative people who are complaining about the weather, traffic, and just can’t be happy.


    Thursday, January 30, 2014

    February Seminars


    Starting a Small Business workshop of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee Small Business Development Center, 4-6 p.m. Tuesday, February 11, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN in the Betty Gibson Hall, Gibson Conf Room 104. Registration is required. Reserve online. www.tsbdc.org. Free.


    5 Steps to Marketing Success workshop of Volunteer State Community College's Tennessee Small Business Development Center, 9-12 p.m. Thursday, February 20, 1480 Nashville Pike, Gallatin, TN in the Betty Gibson Hall, Gibson Conf Room 104. Registration is required. Reserve online. www.tsbdc.org. $25, payable at the workshop

    Monday, January 27, 2014

    Back By Popular Demand

    How to Write a Business Plan



    Fee: $ 30.00
    Payment will be made at the workshop. Checks or cash preferred.
    Thursday, January 30, 2013 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM 


    This is a hands-on workshop that will focus on Marketing, Management, and Financial planning for your business.

    Participants will complete a rough draft of the narrative portion of their business plan during the workshop.

    You will receive a 4 GB Flash Drive with the Business Plan Workbook in Word format.

    Reservations are required and this workshop is limited to 15 people.
    To get here take the GAP Blvd entrance to Volunteer State Community College. Then take your second entrance on the right into the parking lot and the Betty Gibson Building will be right in front of you.